The Return of eLf ideas

ideas of an eLven being in Canada

Wednesday, June 29, 2005


A platter of ripe sweet cherries of the Bing variety Posted by Hello

The name cherry came from the Old Norman French word cherise, which in turn originated from the Latin cerasum.

Cherries originate in Europe and western Asia. In North America, supplies of cherries come mostly from the United States, particularly from California and Washington. In Japan, cherries are grown purely for their blossoms. Known as sakura, the Japanese cherry blossom is a national symbol celebrated during Hanami 花見, 'flower-viewing,' festivals.

The cherry belongs to the family Rosaceae, genus Prunus, (along with other stone fruits such as almonds, apricots, peaches, and plums.)

Scientific names of cherry:
sweet cherry – Prunus avium
sour cherry – Prunus cerasum


A poem I wrote on May 4, 2005, part of the sixteenth series of my dozen verses:

I Pine for Cherry Blossoms Falling By

I pine for cherry blossoms falling by Kaizougawa River
A river lined with snowy-white sakura glist'ning forever.
A house nestling three-minute-walk away from it makes me quiver
About something old but special I recently rediscover.

In the prefecture of Mie-ken lies beautiful Yokkaichi-shi,
Where lovely pale-fuchsia cherry blossom trees effloresce each year
Celebrating the fleeting and ephemeral nature of life.
How I love to be there to join a hanami festivity.

Saraba, mukashi; sayonara, mai katsute koishii.
Gently blown by the morning breeze, five-petaled sakuraso dear!
Scattered across the park, like the thin veils of Winter they're so rife.
This is my last peek at my past; this is my final fantasy.

I pine for cherry blossoms falling by Kaizougawa River——
Saraba, mukashi; sayonara, mai katsute koishii.

5 Comments:

  • At Wednesday, June 29, 2005 11:37:00 PM, Anonymous tessa said…

    hmmmm... sarap nyan ikalog mo sa asin parang duhat sa atin, hehehehe... tessa

     
  • At Thursday, June 30, 2005 4:45:00 AM, Blogger demolition said…

    astig! pati scientific name kasama, kumpleto! parang BB na Minagica! PANDIWA talaga. Ed ng BB ngayon, bro, etneb sahod. Bad trip kasi layo naman nung quality nung ikaw pa tumitira nung mag.

    nakalimutan mo yung peborit nating lahat nung bata pa tayo: aratiles!

     
  • At Thursday, June 30, 2005 9:13:00 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said…

    love strawberry everything but fresh cherries rawk (bottled cherries are as delicious as cough syrup)! i rarely get to eat it but nirvana...

    preserved japanese plums are great too. try cooking japanese rice, make half a ball (triangular shapes are more visually appealing though),put a plum, cover with the other half. press. wrap in seaweed. onigiri yumyum!!!

    Rommie

     
  • At Thursday, June 30, 2005 1:03:00 PM, Blogger eLf ideas said…

    j,
    Feeling ed pa rin ako e. Hehehe. hanap-hanap ko lang siguro yung ginagawa ko sa Diwa before. Hehehe.

    Etneb? Swerte n'ya naman. Samantalang ako nuon, wala pa sa kalahati n'yan. Kaya nga tuloy... hehehe!

    Aratiles? Oo naman, 'dalas ko umakyat sa punong aratiles sa likod-bahay namin sa Makati, pati na rin sa punong ratiles sa bakuran ng Lola Charing ko sa Better Living Subd sa Bicutan.

    Sana nga isa sa mga trabaho na makuha ko rito eventually e sa isang publishing company pa rin. Pero ang naiisip kong targetin ay sa school boards ng mga universities rito...sa curriculum department, taga-edit ng school publications.

     
  • At Thursday, June 30, 2005 1:13:00 PM, Blogger eLf ideas said…

    Rom,
    Bottled cherries cough syrup? You said so! 'kapanindig-balahibo. Hahaha! Though I like eating the cherries in fruit salads.

    You must be a good cook, too. Hmm.

    Hey, Chinese preserved plums are my all-time favorite delicacy since childhood...especially gray kiamoy which my mom used to buy for me in Ongpin. Then when Aji Ichiban came, sa malls na ang bilihan, sosyal na. Hahaha. I usually buy the 'dried salted plum.' In BC, there's a store like Aji. Here in Manitoba, ala pa ako makita. Miss ko na kiamoy!

     

Post a Comment

<< Home